Category - Discipline & Behavior

Bullying in Preschool?

Bullying Prevention
Discipline & Behavior
School Challenges
Toddlers

The preschool years are foundational for children’s social and emotional development—a time when children’s social interactions increase dramatically as they move from parallel to more collaborative play with peers. Not surprisingly, this means more social and communication missteps as children learn how to interact and connect to each other while their social, communication, and emotion-management skills are still in the very early stages of development. What all of this means is that most of the problems you are seeing between and among preschoolers, particularly those under 4, are often signs of poor impulse control and limited language skills, not indications… Continue Reading


Posted by Holly Pedersen on March 12, 2013

You Can’t Come to My Birthday Party! and Other Explorations of Girl* Power

Bullying Prevention
Discipline & Behavior
Raising Girls

Girls explore power through relationships, beginning in the older preschool years. New friendships blossom during this time through imaginative play and common interests.  Bonds between friends deepen, even influencing the mood and emotion of a child if her friend is absent from school.  Many girls are verbal and social, preferring imaginative games that mirror real experiences such as playing house, grocery store, or doctor’s office. Often, girls will take on the powerful roles they see around them:  mom, doctor, or teacher. As friendships form and grow, girls may begin to explore power within this new bond.  They may begin excluding… Continue Reading


Posted by Heidi Emberling on March 5, 2013

This Just In: “Negative Parenting” linked to Misbehavior!

Discipline & Behavior
Parenting Skills

In other breaking news, plants and humans need oxygen, water and sunlight to survive. Did we really need a report from the UK Government Department of Education (whew it’s not just US) to reveal the correlation between a lack of discipline and anti-social behavior? Wait, so “critical and inconsistent parents who don’t set rules or examples of good behavior are twice as likely to have aggressive and disruptive children?” What a crazy, unpredictable world we live in. This ground-breaking study goes on to show “that ‘harsh and inconsistent’ discipline is breeding a generation of young children with anger management problems,… Continue Reading


Posted by Tom Limbert on February 20, 2013

When Your Children Lie: How Parents Can Teach Truthfulness

Discipline & Behavior
Raising Boys
Raising Girls

Raising children to be honest, ethical, and responsible is as important as raising them to master reading, writing, and arithmetic. Honesty, ethics, and responsibility are more than mere character traits. They are essential life skills that must be learned.  Here are strategies for teaching truthfulness and for addressing those challenging situations when you have discovered that your children have lied. Encourage Truthfulness:  Accountability Rather Than Punishment Encouraging truthfulness is more effective than punishing dishonest behavior. This approach starts with controlling your own anger and other intense emotional responses associated with having been lied to by your children. Anger creates fear… Continue Reading


Posted by Holly Pedersen on February 12, 2013

The Energy and Enthusiasm of Preschool Boys!

Discipline & Behavior
Parenting Skills
Raising Boys

Boy play is noisy, boisterous, physical, aggressive, and spontaneous in nature. Dads** understand this play and may intuitively provide these outlets for their rough-and-tumble kids. Research (Lamb, 2000) shows that moms are associated with food, comfort, security, and love, while dads are associated with fun, excitement, and play.  Children need exposure to both types of adult interactions. However, most preschool environments favor women’s interaction styles, verbal and literacy activities, and socio-dramatic play.     At around 3 ½ years old, most boys begin to gravitate towards superhero play. They explore power in multiple ways: externally (I can fly like Superman,… Continue Reading


Posted by Heidi Emberling on December 3, 2012

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